Tag Archives: McLaren

2012 Malaysia GP Preview: McLaren Vs Red Bull?


The Australian GP a few days ago was a superb way to start the 2012 season as we finally got to see which teams have produced a competitive car. The Red Bull has been the clear dominant car of the past two seasons, but this year all indicators strongly suggest this is not the case. In fact, after Qualifying last Saturday, it seemed McLaren might be dominant, but Red Bull’s race pace showed they are very close to McLaren. So, will this continue at Sepang this weekend?

For the past two seasons, at least, Red Bull have performed well at circuits with high speed corners largely due to their exhaust-blown diffusers, so it will interesting to see if they are still best in class aerodynamically at these tracks, e.g. Sepang. The Barcelona track, where the F1 teams tested, is a much better indicator than Albert Park of performance at this type of track. If so, then Lotus could be much more in the mix than they were in Australia.

Mercedes look like they have a good qualifying car with their DRS system, but their race pace is not quite there. Williams looked refreshingly quick and that is great to see. Unfortunately, it is not good to see Ferrari struggling so much. I am sure they will bounce back, but it could take some time. Alonso’s drive in Australia was superb, all things considered, but what is going on with Massa?! He looked very ill at ease with the car, he was slow and was chewing up his tyres.

McLaren could perhaps be the dominant car this season as the close race in Australia masked them managing a fuel issue. So maybe this year’s championship will be Button Vs Hamilton? When they needed to up their pace, McLaren seemed to be able to do that easily in Australia, however, having said that, Hamilton struggled to have a go at passing Vettel after the safety car. If he was much quicker then he would have been a lot closer to Vettel’s rear wing. Perhaps the McLaren is quicker in the first few laps of a stint but once the tyres start to wear they are pretty close to the Red Bulls?

In any case, I will be at the Malaysian Grand Prix this weekend, sitting in the stand at the first corner and will be able to report back. Here’s hoping for another exciting race!

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2012 F1 Testing Begins!


by Jake McMillan


Hoorah, with the 2012 Formula 1 testing beginning at Jerez tomorrow we will finally get a little bit of F1 action! However, as I have warned before, we all need to be very careful about over-analysing the relative performance of the teams. Testing is exactly what it says with teams testing and fine-tuning the performance of the cars. Some things will work and some won’t.

Unless one team is significantly much faster throughout a test session, or is significantly off the pace, we will not know which team is really quickest until we get to Melbourne next month. Despite knowing this, we all get sucked in every year, trying to guess which team will be the fastest. This is okay as long as we  remember that it is just a guess:

  • Teams will be running different fuel loads from each other
  • Teams seeking sponsorship will inevitably want to appear quick by doing more low fuel runs
  • The cars will be developed further between the tests and the first race so until we get to Melbourne we really don’t know
  • All teams ‘sandbag’ to varying degrees

Jenson Button & Mark Webber Enjoy Cod Sperm


by Jake McMillan, Wednesday 5th October 2011.

Today Twitter followers have been treated to some fun banter between two of F1’s most popular drivers, Jenson Button (who has just signed a new multi-year contract with McLaren) and Red Bull’s Mark Webber.

The banter began with Jenson replying to Mark’s joke comment about his rather bare hotel minibar:

Jenson Button also posted a video of some rather bizarre food preparation ritual?

Button’s Amazing Journey to Victory – Canadian GP 2011


Jenson Button’s amazing victory in Canada involved going into the pits 6 times as well as being last as he entered lap 41 before making a remarkable come back and taking the lead from Vettel on the very last lap of the race.

Let’s go through in detail Button’s rollercoaster ride:

Qualified 7th

Lap 5 – After safety car comes in Button is up to 5th as Hamilton and Webber collide at first corner. However, he is struggling on full wet tyres and on goes wide in turn 6 and loses two places to Schumacher and Hamilton and is back in 7th place again.

Lap 6 – Button up to 6th as Hamilton forced wide by Schumacher at the hairpin.

Lap 7 – Button makes a mistake at the last chicane and he and Hamilton collide on the pit straight. Hamilton is out and causes the Safety Car to come out.

Lap 8 – Button comes into the pits for intermediate tyres and rejoins in 12th place, still under the safety car. The team tell him there is no visible damage to his car.

Lap 11 – Race Control investigating Button for speeding under Safety Car conditions.

Lap 13 – the Safety Car is in and Button makes up two places in less than a lap to 10th position but Race Control announce he has a drive through penalty which he takes immediately and rejoins in 15th place.

Lap 14 – Button passes Buemi and is up to 14th place.

Lap 15 – Button passes Barrichello, Sutil and Maldonado and is now in 11th place.

Lap 18 – Button passes di Resta and is in 9th place as Rosberg pits.

Lap 19 – Button passes Petrov and is up to 7th place as Schumacher pits, but it starts to really pour down with rain. Safety Car is deployed and Button pits for full wet tyres and rejoins in 11th.

Lap 22 – Schumacher pits and Button is now 10th.

Lap 25 – The race is red-flagged and suspended.

Laps 26-34 Restart behind safety car – Button is 10th. As the safety car comes in at the end of lap 34, Button has passed Pedro de la Rosa before the Start/Finish line and is 9th.

Lap 35 – Button comes into the pits to change to intermediate tyres and rejoins the track in 15th place.

Lap 36 – Button passes the Virgin of d’Ambrosio and then takes Trulli and Sutil at the hairpin and later on passes Karthikeyan and is up to 11th.

Lap 37 – Button and Alonso (who’s just come out of the pits) collide at the turn 3 chicane. Alonso is beached causing a Safety Car and Button has a left front puncture. By the time he gets back to the pits he is running last in 21st place.

End of lap 40 – Safety car comes in and Jenson is a couple of secs off the back of the pack as he has been limited on speed under the safety car to catch up the rest of the field.

Lap 41 – Button passes Liuzzi and Karthikeyan and is now in 19th place.

Lap 42 – Button passes Trulli and d’Ambrosio and is now in 17th place.

Lap 43 – Button passes Glock and DiResta (pits) and is now in 15th place.

Lap 44 – Button passes de la Rosa and is now in 14th place.

Lap 45 – Button passes Buemi and is now in 13th place and 21 secs behind Vettel.

Lap 46 – Button is ahead of Sutil (who pits) and is now in 12th place.

Lap 49 – Button passes Maldonado and Alguersuari into 10th place, 27 secs behind the leader.

Lap 51 – Webber  and Barrichello pit for super soft dry tyres and Button is 8th.

Lap 52 – Button pits (6th time) and rejoins in 10th place. 18 laps to go and 50secs behind the leader.

Lap 53 – Other drivers come in for dry tyres and Button is now 8th (Massa comes in for new front wing) and does the fastest lap of the race (at that point) with 1min 22.759secs.

Lap 54 – Button is now in 6th place as others drop back due to pitting later and 19.657 secs behind Vettel the leader (who pitted the lap before for super soft dry tyres).

Lap 55 – Button passes Heidfeld and Kobayashi and is up to 4th.

Start of Lap 56, Button is now 15 secs behind Vettel and 6secs behind the fight for 2nd place between Schumacher and Webber. Heidfeld runs over his front wing after damaging it bumping into Kobayashi.

Start of Lap 57, Button is now only 2 seconds behind Webber with a Virgin backmarker inbetween. He is 13 secs behind Vettel with 13 laps to go. However, Race Control put out the safety car to enable the debris from Heidfeld to be picked up. Button is 4th but has Glock in front of him.

Start of Lap 61 and the Safety car has gone in and there are 10 laps to go. Button clears Glock by the Start/Finish line and is 3.5secs behind Vettel. Halfway through the lap, Button is right on the back of Webber who is right behind Schumacher. DRS not enabled yet.

Lap 63 – DRS is enabled and Webber overtakes Schumacher but misses the last chicane and gives place back to Schumacher before turn 3 of lap 64 making sure to not let Button through.

Lap 64 – Webber misses the last chicane again and Button passes him on the start/finish line but has to go onto the wet part of the track on slicks.

Lap 65 – Button passes Schumacher on the back straight and is 3 secs behind Vettel with 5 laps to go and sets a new fastest lap of the race with 1min 18.866secs.

Lap 66 – Button sets another fastest lap (1min 17.967) and has closed the gap to Vettel to 1.5 secs. 4 laps to go.

Lap 67 – Button sets another fastest lap, but Vettel is responding and the gap is 1.3 secs with 3 laps to go.

Lap 68 – Button closes the gap to 1.1secs. 2 laps to go.

Lap 69 (Penultimate Lap) – Button closes to within a second and uses DRS on the back straight. The gap is 0.7secs as we enter the final lap.

Lap 70 (Final Lap) – Vettel under pressure makes a mistake at turn 6 and goes wide and Button is through and takes the victory.

The Barcelona car updates, have the cars really improved?


After the first 4 ‘fly away races’ (Bahrain, Australia, Malaysia & China), the teams have been adding new bits and pieces to their cars to improve performance for the 2010 Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona (circuit de catalunya). But how much have they improved, if at all?

This is rather hard to judge as there is no real baseline to compare. However, the teams all visited the Barcelona track at the final pre-season test at the end of February.

Comparing the fastest lap times from that 4-day test with their qualifying lap times at the Grand Prix shows some rather interesting results. Obviously the track conditions were not exactly the same in February, but their relative performance differences between the two times are somewhat revealing and also quite confusing.

You would expect that the times at the Grand Prix with dry and warm conditions when the drivers are really pushing it as much as they can in the new improved cars that their times would be a lot faster?

Driver Team Spanish GP Qualifying Time Pre-Season Best Time Change
Mark Webber Red Bull 1m19.995s 1m20.479s -0.484s
Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 1m20.101s 1m20.667s -0.566s
Lewis Hamilton McLaren 1m20.829s 1m20.472s +0.357s
Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1m20.937s 1m20.637s +0.300s
Jenson Button McLaren 1m20.991s 1m21.450s -0.459s
Michael Schumacher Mercedes 1m21.294s 1m20.745s +0.549s
Robert Kubica Renault 1m21.353s 1m23.175s -1.822s
Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1m21.408s 1m20.686s +0.722s
Felipe Massa Ferrari 1m21.585s 1m20.539s +1.046s
Kamui Kobayashi Sauber 1m21.725s 1m20.911s +0.814s
Adrian Sutil Force India 1m21.985s 1m20.611s +1.374s
Pedro de la Rosa Sauber 1m22.026s 1m20.973s +1.053s
Nico Hulkenberg Williams 1m22.131s 1m20.614s +1.517s
Vitaly Petrov Renault 1m22.139s 1m22.523s -0.384s
Sebastien Buemi Toro Rosso 1m22.191s 1m21.413s +0.778s
Jaime Alguersuari Toro Rosso 1m22.207s 1m21.571s +0.636s
Vitantonio Liuzzi Force India 1m22.854s 1m21.056s +1.798s
Rubens Barrichello Williams 1m23.125s 1m20.870s +2.255s
Jarno Trulli Lotus 1m24.674s 1m25.059s -0.385s
Heikki Kovalainen Lotus 1m24.748s 1m25.251s -0.503s
Timo Glock Virgin 1m25.475s 1m25.942s -0.467s
Lucas di Grassi Virgin 1m25.556s 1m26.160s -0.604s
Karun Chandhok Hispania 1m26.750s DNA N/A
Bruno Senna Hispania 1m27.122s DNA N/A

Surprisingly only 4 teams (Redbull, Renault, Lotus and Virgin) had improved times at Barcelona this weekend. All other teams had slower times (Jenson Button being the only exception).

Redbull’s improvement is very impressive, with both drivers able to deliver times half a second quicker than they went at the end of February. Lotus and Virgin both show half a second improvement which suggests that Lotus’s new changes are not as advanced as they hoped for.

The biggest change is Robert Kubica’s Renualt with a nearly 2 second improvement, whereas his teammate Petrov was only able to achieve a 0.4secs improvement.

Williams have a lot to be concerned about as Hulkenberg was a massive 1.5secs slower and Barrichello a horrendous 2.255secs slower. The Force India cars were 1.5secs slower on average, Sauber about one second slower , Toro Rosso 0.7secs slower and Mercedes just over half a second slower. The Ferrari of Alonso and Hamilton’s McLaren were at least three tenths slower.

So does this mean the team’s improvements have actually made their cars worse? Well, track conditions have to be factored in, but certainly don’t explain all the difference. It could also be speculated that during the pre-season test some teams ran low fuel using a lower ride height (i.e. not also being set up for a full tank of fuel as they do in qualifying).

Whatever the reason, one thing is very clear, Red Bull are simply doing a better job at developing their car than anyone else.

Button and Hamilton, McLaren’s Dream Team?


McLaren’s one-two in China was quite impressive as although they don’t seem to quite have the fastest car, both drivers got the maximum out of their equipment using different strategies and made the rest of the field look quite average. It’s still very early days, but could the pairing of Button and Hamilton be McLaren’s dream team?

Some of the fans of Hamilton, in particular, seem to not think this judging by the comments made on discussion boards. These views were vocalised before the start the season and most recently I read a lot of silly comments on Andrew Benson’s recent blog on the BBC where a lot of Hamilton fans seem to completely refuse the fact that Button, despite winning two of the four races this year, might be as quick as their favourite driver sometimes.

Thankfully the drivers themselves are being very professional and seem to be getting on well, so far(!), and have given each other a lot of respect whilst at the same time pushing each other and the team very hard. This is exactly the way it should be and can really drive a team to the front of the pack.

Earlier in the year I wrote about the similarity of their differing driving styles with the great battle between Senna and Prost at McLaren in 1988-1989. That battle became one of the most acrimonious and intense rivalries in Formula 1 history. The reasons for this were complex, but a big part of it was Senna being unable to accept that Prost, who had such an opposite approach to him, could be as quick he was.

I wrote that I believed, and still do, that the rivalry between Button and Hamilton will not be anywhere near as acrimonious as the Senna versus Prost battle. There seems to be a great potential that Lewis and Jenson could prove to be a most dynamic and fruitful partnership that could bring great success to them both and the team.

The evidence is clear that both Hamilton and Button are quick drivers and seem evenly matched, but their driving skills are different. There will be days when Hamilton is quicker and there will be days when Button is faster. Crucially, both drivers seem to have accepted this and this can only be good for them and the team.

McLaren Team Principal, Martin Whitmarsh, will be delighted with how the partnership is working out at the moment. The drivers are pushing each other hard, but are working together where it counts to develop the car into a consistent race winner.

Their supportive demeanour for each other has been clear to see and this could be the beginnings of a McLaren dream team. I hope that fans of both Hamilton and Button will start to see it this way too.

Button’s Great Decision


No, I’m not talking about his decision not to go for the intermediate tyres like so many of his competitors at the beginning of the Chinese Grand Prix today, but his decision to drive for McLaren in 2010.

It was almost universal opinion last year that Jenson Button’s decision to leave Brawn GP and drive for McLaren was foolish. Even the most loyal fans questioned it and saw it as a risky manoeuvre.

On the face of it, it really didn’t make any sense:

  • Why leave a Championship-winning team?
  • Why leave a team where you are totally embedded into the team as the No.1 driver?
  • Why risk going to another team that had made a truly awful car that year?
  • Why risk being a team-mate to Lewis Hamilton, respected as being one of the very quickest drivers in F1?
  • Why risk being team-mate to Lewis where he is already totally embedded into the team?

Fans and pundits alike came out (e.g. Jackie Stewart andNigel Mansell) to criticise the decision or, at least, to say that Button would struggle against Hamilton in the first year.

Jenson said he needed a bigger challenge to motivate himself and on closer inspection you could almost understand that driving against Nico Rosberg he would not enhance his reputation, he could only damage it. If he drove against Lewis, with most people seeing Hamilton as the better driver, he could enhance his reputation and would not damage it that much if he wasn’t as quick.

Like most people, I was very surprised at his decision to go to McLaren, but the more I thought about it, the more I understood his motives. I think the reality is that he really does want the challenge. He has proved he can win a World Championship and now he wants to prove to himself he can go up against the very best drivers in the same equipment.

So far, after the 4th Grand Prix in Shanghai, he has proved a lot of people very wrong which is always nice to see. There is a long way in the Championship to go, but already Jenson has proved that he and Lewis are closely matched, but clearly are very different drivers.

Jenson Button is leading the championship and has won 50% of the races this year so far. His decision-making skills are clearly as good as his driving.